Forest Actions 2006

Click here for forest actions in the Bonang River area (centre rd and survey rd) in 2006

Click here for forest actions in the Goongerah and Yalmy forests in 2006

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Media Release
27 September 2006

Escalation in forest protests in East Gippsland

Forest protection actions have escalated for a third day in the old growth forests of East Gippsland after four activists were arrested in the treetops yesterday.

Forty activists have stopped logging in the old growth forests of Little River, near Goongerah,  stopping tree felling by sheer weight of numbers and locking onto logging machinery. Spokesperson for the activists Mark Tyler said “ It is a matter of weeks until the Victorian State election, in a year in which 15,000 people turned out on the streets of Melbourne on June 6, demanding an end to old growth logging. The time has come for Steve Bracks to show leadership and listen to the majority of the Victorian people by protecting our remaining old growth forests.’

“Premier Bracks and Ted Baillieu cannot plead ignorance to the mounting community pressure on this issue. At a time when deforestation has been clearly linked to climate change and global warming both major parties continue to sit on their hands and do nothing, while our old growth forests are logged and woodchipped.”

“The time has come for action from our parliamentarians to protect our remaining old growth forests and end the woodchip driven destruction. If those who are in positions of power are not prepared to act to stop this, community actions such as this one will have to continue” Mr Tyler concluded.

Click here for previous actions in this forest


Woodchip Ship Stopped

Fifteen conservationists have entered Victoria’s largest export woodchip facility this morning, preventing the loading of a shipment of Victorian native forest woodchips bound for Japan.

The conservationists have ‘locked on’ to the conveyer belt and have boarded the ship.

The woodchip facility exports native forest woodchips from the East Gippsland region, where there has been a massive increase in logging in the Tambo forest management area.  Logs are taken to Geelong by the train from Bairnsdale and are turned into woodchips at the docks before being exported to Japan.

“While local mills in East Gippsland are closing due to lack of logs, whole logs are being taken from the region to be exported as woodchips to Japan.  Local people have being putting up with increased log trucks through town, and seeing our forests disappearing down the line on the train with absolutely no benefit to East Gippsland” said spokesperson Danya Brix.

“The Bracks government must act by protecting native forests from the export woodchipping industry before it’s too late. State Labor governments in New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australia have recently moved to protect large areas of forests, yet the Bracks government allows this needless destruction and export of our native forests for a pittance,” she concluded.

Banner drop at the Midways woodchip mill Protesters lock on to conveyer belt at Midways Police arrive at Midways woodchip mill
Banner drop at the Midways woodchip mill Protesters lock on to conveyer belt Police at the massive woodchip pile, Midways

News.com.au | Daily Telegraph | Melbourne Herald Sun | Adelaide Advertiser | The Australian

Woodchip protesters chained to conveyer

From: AAP

July 25, 2006

SIX conservationists, some chained to a conveyer belt, are trying to prevent woodchips being loaded on to a ship in the Victorian city of Geelong.

Four of the protesters had chained themselves to the conveyer system at logging company Midway Plantations in the Geelong suburb of North Shore, group spokesman Mark Tyler said.

Two others had boarded the ship, the Meridian, he said.

Mr Tyler said the chips came from native forests in Victoria's Central Highlands and East Gippsland regions that housed Melbourne's water catchments and habitats of endangered species including the sooty owl and tiger quoll.

"Desperate times call for desperate measures," Mr Tyler said.

"We want to put pressure on (Victorian Premier) Steve Bracks and the industry to start listening to the public, which is demanding a stop to logging old growth forests."

The six protesters say they are not affiliated with any environmental group but are concerned Victoria's native forests would be lost to export woodchips.
A spokeswoman for Midway Plantations would not comment.

The Age Online

Bolt-cutters used to unchain protesters

A police search and rescue squad is using bolt-cutters to remove protesters chained to a conveyor belt loading woodchips onto a ship docked at Geelong.

Two protesters chained themselves to the conveyor belt and a further four protesters boarded the ship docked at Corio Quay at dawn, in a bid to stop the woodchips being exported to Japan.

Protester Mark Tyler said the woodchips came from native forests _ in Victoria's Central Highlands and East Gippsland _ that housed water catchments and endangered species including the sooty owl and tiger quoll.

"We want to put pressure on (Premier) Steve Bracks and the industry to start listening to the public, which is demanding a stop to logging old growth forests," Mr Tyler said.

The woodchips are exported by logging company Midway Plantations and are due to leave for Japan tomorrow on a chartered ship.

Toll Geelong Port general manager Lindsay Ward said the protest had only "a minor impact on the port's operation".

Police spokeswoman Bradie Owens said the protesters were likely to be charged with trespass offences under Commonwealth law.

ABC Online

Police remove woodchip protesters

Tuesday, 25 July 2006. 14:00 (AEDT) Police are removing a group of protesters from an export woodchip mill at Geelong.

The conservationists entered the Midway Mill and Wharf this morning, to prevent the loading of a shipment of woodchips to Japan.

Police have removed four people who boarded the ship and another two locked onto a conveyor belt.

The company has been unavailable for comment.

Protester Danya Bryx says forests in East Gippsland and the Central Highlands are being logged for woodchips.

"We're doing this to put pressure on the Bracks Government to once and for all end the wholesale destruction of Victoria's old growth forests and domestic water catchments to feed the export woodchipping industry," she said.


Protesters move back into Eden Chipmill

ABC Online

Protesters fight woodchipping outside Eden mill Environmentalists are back at the Eden woodchip mill just days after staging a rally outside the mill to highlight their frustration over governments' failure to halt woodchipping of native forests.

About 30 demonstrators have set up a blockade this morning on the road leading into the Eden mill in south-east New South Wales.

A protester is perched on top of a structure set up alongside the road with connecting ropes stretched across the road.

Trucks have been prevented from entering the mill and are lined up along Edrom Road and police have been called to the area.


MASS RALLY AT EDEN WOODCHIP MILL A “HUGE SUCCESS”.

A mass rally at the Eden woodchip mill today has been declared a “huge success” by organisers.

Between 600 and 700 people attended today’s rally, traveling from all over the south east woodchipping region as well as Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra with a large turnout of local people.

The rally was sponsored by almost 30 local, regional, national Australian and Japanese conservation groups to urge Governments to close the chipmill by moving the woodchipping industry to existing plantations.

“Taking into account that it is mid-winter and that Eden is a long journey for many people, we are absolutely thrilled by this result,” said spokesperson for the organisers, Ms Harriett Swift.

Singers, speakers, artists and musicians were highlights of a family friendly morning at the gates of the South East Fibre Exports woodchip mill at Eden.

The culmination of the rally was a unanimous resolution in favour of closing the Eden chipmill, which stated: Speakers were Senator Kerry Nettle, Ms Cate Faehrmann, Director of the Nature Conservation Council, John Seed, Rainforest Information Centre, Jill Redwood, Environment East Gippsland and Harriett Swift of the Chipstop campaign against woodchipping.

Ms Swift said that the rally was conducted as a peaceful and lawful event, with the permission and co-operation of police. Nobody was arrested on the day

She said that the organisers were thrilled by the turnout and conduct of the rally and were confident that it would place the woodchipping issue firmly back in a high place on the public agenda, where it belongs.

The organisers estimated crowd numbers by keeping a tally of the passengers in buses and cars as they directed them to organized parking spaces.

Eden woodchip mill rally Eden woodchip mill rally Eden woodchip mill rally
photos courtesy of http://www.ecoaction.net.au  


Media Release
30 June 2006

Twenty Stop Logging

Twenty people have stopped logging in old growth forest in East Gippsland, Victoria today. The group walked into a logging coupe in the Delegate River catchment, between the Snowy River and Errinundra National Parks, near Bonang. The logging coupe contains large trees and is adjacent to forest reserved for its old growth values.

“Despite the wet weather and strong public opposition, logging of Victoria’s forest is still continuing all year around. When that logging is taking place in domestic water catchments and in old growth forest, it is clearly a situation that cannot continue,” said spokesperson for conservationists, Fiona York.

“Victorians should not have to witness these last stands of big old trees travelling to export woodchip mills on the back of log trucks. It is about time the Premier Steve Bracks bit the bullet and protected these forests once and for all,” she concluded.

For more information:
Fiona York
0351540174.


City protesters take to tree

May 31, 2006 - 6:57AM

Activists will spend five chilly days in a tree overlooking one of Melbourne's busiest roads in a bid to pressure the Victorian Government to protect the state's forests.

Environmentalists from the Australian Student Environment Network (ASEN) will occupy a tree platform 15 metres above St Kilda Rd until World Environment Day on Sunday, when they will join a rally at the State Library in Swanston Street.

"We ask the community to come along to the rally and stand tall for Victoria's forests," said ASEN spokeswoman Julia Dehm."

"We are raising awareness of the plight of old growth forest, rainforest and endangered species habitat currently being logged and chipped across Victoria."

The habitats of endangered and threatened species, including the spot-tailed quoll, were at risk from logging, Ms Dehm said.

Participants in Sunday's rally will march from the State Library to Federation Square, where actor Jack Thompson will speak and band the John Butler Trio will perform.


UPDATE: Search and Rescue have arrived, along with police and enforcement officers. They have asked people to leave the coupe and are threatening people with "costs". The lock ons remain in place, the tripod is down but the person is still up the tree. Three people have been charged with "hindering a logging operation" and "failure to obey an authorised officer."

Media Release
10 April 2006

New Forest Blockade Stops Logging near Goolengook

Twenty people have stopped logging in old growth forest less than 100 metres from the Goolengook forest. Two people are locked to logging machinery, while a tripod and tree platform are preventing access to the logging coupe. The coupe is on the border of the Goolengook block, on the headwaters of the Arte River. It contains old growth forest and rainforest. The Goolengook forest is currently the subject of an investigation by the Victorian Environment Assessment Council (VEAC).

The forest blockade today is the fifteenth in East Gippsland since December. There have been 30 arrests so far and more are expected today.

“While the Goolengook forest is being investigated and under moratorium from logging, forest of comparable value is being logged right on its border,” said spokesperson for the conservationists Fiona York.

“Premier Steve Bracks needs to do more than just investigate icon areas for the sake of a few votes. All old growth forest needs to be protected immediately,” she continued.

“Logging areas such as these, in the headwaters of the Arte River, not only destroys old growth forest and rainforest, it also destroys the integrity of the iconic Goolengook forest,” she concluded.

For more information

Fiona York
0351540174

ABC Online

Three arrested at forest protest

Monday, 10 April 2006. 14:00 (AEDT)
Three people have been arrested at a forest blockade on the Arte River, near the Goolengook Forest in East Gippsland.

Thirty people have been arrested at forest blockades in the area this summer.

Anti-logging protester Fiona Yorke says the coup contains old growth forest.

"It's in the headwaters of the Arte River and it contains old growth forests and rainforests, there's a person up a tree platform blocking the road and there's also a person on a tripod and there are two people locked to logging machines," she said.

The Age Online

Protesters held over logging blockade


April 10, 2006 - 3:34PM

Police have arrested three anti-logging protesters and moved 17 other demonstrators from a blockade in the East Gippsland region of Victoria.

Goongerah Environment Centre (GEC) spokeswoman Fiona York said the protest was in an area of old growth forest being logged less than 100 metres from the Goolengook forest.

The three protester who were arrested had chained themselves to logging machinery, she said.

"The rest of them have been moved out of the coupe by 20 or so Parks Victoria, DSE (Department of Sustainability and Environment) and police," Ms York said.

Thirty arrests had been made at 15 blockades in East Gippsland since December 2005, she said.

The Goolengook Forest is the subject of an investigation by the Victorian Environment Assessment Council (VEAC).

"This particular coupe is right on the border of the assessment area that VEAC is looking into protection for Goolengook," Ms York said.

"While the Goolengook Forest is being investigated and under moratorium from logging, forest of comparable value is being logged right next door."

The area was at the headwaters of the Arte River, and the old-growth forest and rainforest were habitat for endangered flora and fauna, she said. Its unique eco-system was home to more than 300 rare and threatened plant and animal species, including the tiger quoll and the powerful owl.

"Premier Steve Bracks needs to do more than just investigate icon areas for the sake of a few votes," Ms York said.

"All old growth forest needs to be protected immediately."
Goolengook Study Area Logging coupe adjacent to Goolengook
Goolengook Study Area (in light green) - Victorian Environment Assessment Council Logging coupe on the border of Goolengook - Freds Track


CLICK HERE FOR QUICKTIME MOVIE OF PROTESTER ASSAULT BY MILL WORKERS (600kb)

LAWYERS FOR FORESTS

MEDIA RELEASE: 31 JANUARY 2006

VIOLENCE AGAINST CONSERVATIONISTS
• COMPLAINT FILED WITH THE NEW SOUTH WALES POLICE

On 27 January 2006, legal assistance was sought from Lawyers for Forests Inc relating to allegations that numerous individuals were being assaulted during a peaceful protest at the South East Fibre Exports Wood Chip Mill Compound in Eden, New South Wales, near the Victorian border.

Lawyers for Forests arranged for legal assistance for the complainant and, as a result, the complainant has filed a complaint with the New South Wales Police today.

The allegations are against employees or contractors of the Chip Mill as well as truck drivers that were at the Mill, and include:
• being assaulted by being sprayed with high pressure hoses
• witnessing another 4 individuals involved in the peaceful protest get directly sprayed with high pressure hoses
• witnessing an individual involved in the peaceful protest who was filming the incident get physically assaulted and harassed.

The complainant explained that individuals at the Chip Mill (who were dressed like and appeared to be security officers) directed the employees or contractors of the Chip Mill to hose her down with the high pressure hoses. The complainant alleges that the Chip Mill workers may have breached occupational health and safety regulations, including by running machinery near the peaceful protesters.

“Lawyers for Forests frequently receives complaints of violence against conservationists during peaceful protests to stop logging old growth forest”, Lawyers for Forests President Vanessa Bleyer said. “There have been no complaints in Victoria for about 12 months now, however complaints coming from New South Wales have increased”.

The complainant explained that at no stage did she or any of the other individuals involved in the peaceful protest become aggressive or threatening. The protest was peaceful. The protest was to stop the wood-chipping of old growth and native forests from East Gippsland in Victoria and from New South Wales.

For more information call:
- Vanessa Bleyer, President of Lawyers for Forests Inc, 0412 58 68 48.
- Billy Dain, spokesperson for Goongerah Environment Centre, 03 5154 0156


Media Release
27 January 2006
CHIPMILL SHUT DOWN

Twenty five conservationists have shut down the Eden woodchip mill this morning, with four people locked on to machinery inside. The Japanese-owned chipmill exports woodchips to Japan from East Gippsland and South-East New South Wales forests. The protest follows a week of blockades in East Gippsland’s old growth forest, which resulted in 13 arrests.

Protesters inside the chipmill are being sprayed with high-pressure hoses by mill workers and police are not yet in attendance.

“Eighty percent of timber from East Gippsland and the South-East ends up as woodchips which are exported to Japan. On Australia Day, many Australians see this as madness,” said Billy Dain, spokesperson for the protesters.

“The Victorian and NSW premiers, who pride themselves on their green credentials, must act to stop this ongoing forest destruction,” he concluded.


ABC Online ABC Regional (Bega)

Police arrest mill protesters

Police have arrested two protesters at a woodchip mill in Eden on the south coast of NSW and are expecting to charge a further two.

The four women brought mill operations to a halt when they chained themselves to machinery used to unload log trucks.

Mill operators were able to cut two of the women clear but a police rescue squad from Cooma had to be called in to remove the others.

Police say they are still deciding whether to lay charges against six other protesters they removed from the mill this morning.


Bega District News. Page 1

Four arrested at chipmill
Tuesday, 31 January 2006

FOUR women were arrested last Friday after they entered the Eden chipmill and held up work by attaching themselves to machines.

They were among a group of protestors who locked themselves to the machines that unload log trucks and move logs around the mill.

The log loading machines were strategically targetted to achieve an impact, for without them trucks cannot be unloaded and new logs from the log stockpiles cannot be positioned for chipping.

A spokesperson for the conservationists, Ms Harriett Swift, said that not only were the log loaders central to the running of the chipmill, they also illustrated what a highly mechanised and capital-intensive industry woodchipping had become.

"Enormous machines like these show why it takes a million dollars of investment to create one job in the woodchipping industry," she said.

Ms Swift said that the aim of those taking part was to draw attention to "the continuing tragedy of woodchipping of the region's native forests".

"The industry has just resumed work for the year and we wanted to send a clear message to the company and the Government that this industry is totally unacceptable.

"We don't want it and we don't need it and the industry should be moving to use some of the vast stock of plantation hardwood available in Australia," she said.

An electric security fence was erected around the whole area last year and since then, South East Fibre Exports has further fortified its fence by adding a thick strip of concrete at the base of the fence for the whole distance around the mill.

"The increased fortifications have not worked and the mill will continue to be targeted while it continues to drive the destruction of our native forests," Ms Swift said.


UPDATE:

Nine people have been arrested at Cobon, seven of them under the new Public Safety Zone legislation. This is the first time this legislation has been used. Two people remain locked on to logging equipment, halting logging. The seven others remain in the coupe after refusing to leave, and have been arrested on summons. Police, DSE and Vicforests are in attendance.

Media Release
January 20 2006

Logging Halted Again
-fifth blockade this week

Fifteen people have stopped work in a logging coupe in Far East Gippsland, with two people locking themselves to logging machines.  The logging coupe is in old growth forest adjacent to the Errinundra National Park, near where the Park was illegally logged last year. 

Today’s action is the fifth blockade this week, with logging work being halted for two days on Monday in a logging coupe near Bendoc in Far East Gippsland, resulting in three arrests.  A tree platform was removed by Search and Rescue police on Tuesday at a blockade in Goongerah resulting in one arrest.  However, the blockade remains in place, along with another blockade in the Yalmy forest, which are preventing access to five logging coupes in old growth forest and water catchments.

Yesterday, work on a logging road in the Martin’s Creek forest was stopped, with a tree platform attached to a roading machine.  The road will allow logging in another five old growth logging coupes.  There were no arrests.

“The amount of protest activity in East Gippsland this week is indicative of exactly how much old growth forest is still being logged in this area.  These areas contain massive 300 year old trees, waterfalls and rainforest species.  They should not be logged,” said spokesperson for the conservationists Fiona York

“Premier Steve Bracks must do something to protect these last remaining areas of old growth forests or protests will continue,” she concluded.

For more information:
Fiona York
0351540174


Anti-logger protesters arrested

20-01-2006, 615pm
From: AAP News
TEN anti-logging protesters, blockading an isolated patch of forest in Victoria's far East Gippsland, may be the first to be the first charged under a new state law.

A Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE) spokesman said today that 10 people were expected to be charged on summons under the Safety on Public Land Act, which came into effect in December 2004. Goongerah Environment Centre spokeswoman Fiona York said two of the protesters were locked on to logging machinery, six had refused to leave the blockade and one had been taken away by police for an identity check.

She said the site was at a logging coupe in old growth forest, next to the Errinundra National Park, about 90 minutes' drive north-east of Orbost.

Another six protesters moved on when police asked them to leave.

Ms York spoke with the remaining blockaders by phone today and said they were determined to stay at the site.

"They said they were all set and everybody was happy and in good spirits," Ms York said.

Three Orbost police attended the scene today and Ms York said two DSE officers had made the arrests, with no loggers present.

She said today's blockade was the fifth in the area this week and that another 35 people were blockading two other sites at Goongerah and Yalmy forests, which included local water supply catchment areas.

Ms York said three people were arrested at a blockade on Monday after halting work for two days at a logging coupe near Bendoc and that local residents were driving out to support the protesters, bringing food and supplies.

"The amount of protest activity in East Gippsland this week is indicative of exactly how much old growth forest is still being logged in this area," Ms York said.

"These areas contain massive 300-year-old trees, waterfalls and rainforest species. They should not be logged.

"Every day the equivalent to 27 MCGs are cleared. Premier Steve Bracks must act to protect old growth forests and water catchments for future generations."


Herald Sun

Forest protest charges

Sarah Wotherspoon
Saturday 21jan06

TEN anti-logging protesters will face fines of more than $6000 after police and Department of Sustainability and Environment officers swooped on a blockade in East Gippsland.

The activists will be charged on summons under the new Safety on Public Lands Act.
It is believed they will be the first people charged under the new rules, enacted in December 2004.
The Act enables the DSE to exclude the public from areas of state forests for reasons including conservation and timber removal.
Lawyers for Forests President Vanessa Bleyer said three declarations of the act had been to protect logging coops.
The protesters were blocking a logging coop on the Errinundra Plateau, about 80km north-east of Orbost.
Campaigner Fiona York said the act was outrageous.
"These new laws mean the public cannot see what's going on.
"We are still going to try to stop them," she said.
"We will be here until Steve Bracks makes a commitment not to log old-growth forests."


Media Release
Thursday, 19th January

Protest Stops Logging Road
-fourth blockade this week

Fifteen conservationists have stopped work on a logging road today in East Gippsland by connecting a tree platform to roading machinery. The road is in the Martin’s Creek Forest and allows log trucks to access at least five logging coupes in old growth forest.

This is the fourth forest blockade in East Gippsland this week, with protesters stopping a logging coupe in the Bendoc region on Monday, resulting in three arrests.  Meanwhile two other blockade camps continue to be held in the Goongerah and Yalmy forests, which stop access to five logging coupes. Despite arrests on Tuesday, when a tree platform was removed by Search and Rescue, the blockade in Goongerah remains, with a strong backing from the community who are concerned about the effect of logging on their water.

“It is time for the Brack’s government to make a strong commitment to the protection of remaining old growth forest and domestic water catchments in Victoria,’ stated Fiona York spokesperson for the Goongerah Environment Centre.

“These areas contain massive trees, waterfalls, and rainforest species.  They are worth more to Victorians for their clean water than for woodchips.  Until this exploitation stops protests will continue” she said

For further comment:
Fiona York – 03 51540174
www.geco.org.au


The Herald Sun Nine MSN

Logging protesters block road

19jan06

PROTESTERS have seized control of a logging road in the Martin's Creek catchment area in Victoria's east, blocking access to five logging coupes.

The action, which police have described as peaceful, has halted logging in the area.
The 10 protesters have attached a platform to logging machinery, effectively creating a 25m-high sit-in.

The Martin's Creek area in East Gippsland had not been logged before and contained large old-growth trees, Goongerah Environment Centre spokeswoman Fiona York said.

The sit-in is part of a series of anti-logging protests which have been staged in the area in recent days.

Earlier this week, police removed two protesters who used thumbcuffs to attach themselves to logging equipment.


GOONGERAH BLOCKADE BUSTED - CLICK HERE


Cops and loggers Thumbs Up! DSE arrest
Little River bust monster machines - goodbye to old growth Microcop takes it out on a tarp

Media Release
17 January 2006

Blockade Busted

Thirty police and government officers have busted the blockade of a logging coupe near Bendoc in Far East Gippsland.  Protesters have been told to leave the area and an “exclusion zone” has been established.  Two people, who remained locked to logging machinery overnight, despite heavy rain, have been arrested, and one has been taken to the Bendoc Police station. Logging in the coupe has been stopped since early yesterday morning.

The logging coupe contains trees of 10 metres in girth and is adjacent to reserved forest.  

Meanwhile, conservationists are continuing to maintain two blockades in the Yalmy and Goongerah forests for the second week.  Government officers have not removed the tree platforms and other structures, which are preventing logging from commencing in five logging coupes.  The blockades are in old growth forest and water catchment areas, and form part of a corridor between the Errinundra and Snowy River National Parks. 

“Victoria has fallen behind the rest of the country in terms of forest protection, and Premier Steve Bracks can expect protest activity to continue until he protects our forests.” said spokesperson for conservationists, Fiona York.

“There is strong community opposition to logging in old growth forest and water catchments in East Gippsland.  Permanent protection of these last remaining areas is long overdue,” she continued.

High resolution photos are available.

For more information:
Fiona York


Update: 17 January 2006 9.45 am

Thirty Search and Rescue, Police and Vicforest officers have busted the blockade near Bendoc and have told protesters to move out of the area. Two people remain locked to the logloader and have been arrested. Protesters are still in the area, and no further arrests have taken place. The lockons remained overnight despite extremely heavy rain.


ABC Online ABC Regional

Four charged over logging blockade

Police have charged four conservationists with obstructing logging operations at forest blockades in eastern Victoria today.

About 30 protesters are blocking road access to forests at Goongerah and Yalmy, north of Orbost.

But logging has restarted in coups on the Errinundra Plateau near Bendoc, where police have removed two people from logging machinery.

VicForests says it is not safe to log the area while protests are taking place.

Goongerah Environment Centre spokeswoman Fiona York says she expects more arrests tomorrow.

"The police search and rescue have been very systematic and generally the protests, as well as the removal of them, has gone smoothly and we're expecting some more of that to continue tomorrow," she said.


The Australian The Herald Sun The Adelaide Advertiser

Police break up logging blockade

January 17, 2006
TWO protesters were arrested as police broke up a blockade in forests near Bendoc in East Gippsland, Victoria.

The pair, part of a group of 25, had used thumbcuffs to chain themselves to logging machinery overnight.

A police spokesman described the incident as relatively peaceful and said the protesters had not been charged with any offence.

The protest had delayed logging of 10m-high old growth trees in an area adjacent to a reserve forest.

The blockade was part of series of protests being staged by environmentalists in East Gippsland with protesters predicting a long campaign ahead.

"We're focusing on Goongerah first, trying to prevent loggers from working in there," Goongerah Environment Centre spokeswoman Fiona York said.


Media Release

16 January 2006

Logging stopped
- third blockade starts

Twenty-five conservationists have halted logging in old growth forest near Bendoc. Two people have locked themselves to logging machinery, halting work in the coupe since early this morning. The logging coupe contains trees of 10 metres in girth and is adjacent to reserved forest.

Meanwhile, conservationists are continuing to maintain two blockades in the Yalmy and Goongerah forests for the second week. Government officers have not removed the tree platforms and other structures, which are preventing logging from commencing in five logging coupes. The blockades are in old growth forest and water catchment areas, and form part of a corridor between the Errinundra and Snowy River National Parks.

“There are currently three blockades in East Gippsland, preventing logging in old growth forest. Premier Steve Bracks can expect protest activity to continue until he protects our forests,” said spokesperson for conservationists, Fiona York.

“There is strong community opposition to logging in old growth forest and water catchments in East Gippsland. Permanent protection of these last remaining areas is long overdue,” she continued.

Arrests are expected.

For more information:
Fiona York
Bracks banner Locking on
Logging stopped in an old growth logging coupe Two girls fightin for the forests

ABC Online

Forest protester arrested in E Gippsland

A woman has been arrested at a forest blockade on the Errinundra Plateau near Bendoc in East Gippsland this morning.

Two protesters have locked onto logging machinery.

Anti-logging protesters say two other blockades in the Goongerah and Yalmi forests have stopped logging in five coups.

Fiona York from the Goongerah Environment Centre says she expects more arrests.

"We've got 25 people in a logging coups near Bendoc and there are two people currently locked to a logging machine preventing work," she said.


The Australian The Adelaide Advertiser, the Herald Sun, the Daily Telegraph

Protest halts logging

January 16, 2006
ANTI-logging protesters have fastened themselves to machinery in Victoria's East Gippsland forests, halting logging work.

Conservationists today said the protest at Bendoc, the third in the region, was a warning to the Bracks Government that protest activity would continue unless more was done to protect old growth forests.

"Victoria has fallen behind every other state in terms of forest protection," Goongerah Environment centre spokeswoman Fiona York said.

She said two blockades preventing logging in the nearby Yalmy and Goonerah forests were into their second week.

Twenty-five demonstrators were involved in the latest protest, with two locking themselves to machinery, Ms York said.


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